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Nagalro, the Professional Association for Children's Guardians, Family Court Advisers and Independent Social Workers, has recently published details of its submission to the All Party Parliamentary Group on Child Protection on how children will be affected by the government's proposed reforms of the family courts.

Nagalro's submission relates to three main areas:

  • the plan to reduce court scrutiny of children's care plans;
  • the impact of the proposal to limit care proceedings cases to six months, and
  • how to ensure that decisions taken are in the best interests of children.

Nagalro has welcomed the Government's commitment to ensuring that both parents can continue to be involved in a child's life after separation, but does not believe that the legislative options proposed by the Government are the best way of achieving this aim. Nagalro would prefer to see the change be driven by a focus on children's welfare, rather than on the rights of parents.

Nagalro would like to see more opportunities for children's voices to be heard in private law cases, and greater support for both parents and children going through separation or divorce.

 

Posted by on in Divorce

A recent study has found that disputes over household chores comes closely after infidelity and drifting apart in the list of reasons why UK couples get divorced, reports the Daily Mail.

The research, carried out by Vileda, found that 56% of people polled thought disputes over normal domestic chores played a major part in their decision to separate. Items left lying around the house was the most common cause of argument (26%), followed by partners 'not pulling their weight' and not doing the washing up.

Lindsey Taylor, brand manager for Vileda, said: 'There may be another major reason behind a break-up, such as money worries or drifting apart, but it can be the little rows over things like washing up that can help tip rowing couples over the edge,' reports the Daily Mail.

A recent study from America has found that modern technology such as email, texts or social media can be an effective method of communication for separating or divorcing couples, but can also be open to abuse.

Researchers at the University of Missouri interviewed divorced parents about the state of their relationship with their ex-partner. They found that parents whose relationship was generally cooperative found communication technology a useful way of sharing information about their children. However, couples that had a hostile relationship used the technology to manipulate their ex-partner, for example by pretending not to have received emails.

“Parents who are hostile need to set their feelings aside and understand that they need to communicate effectively in order to protect the emotional well-being of their children,” said Lawrence Ganong, a professor of human development and family studies at MU. “Email is a great resource for hostile parents who can’t talk face-to-face. They can communicate essential information while editing what they say to avoid conflict. Also, the parents have a record of what was agreed upon.”

Posted by on in Divorce

Recent research has revealed that 21.6 million Brits have held onto photographs of former partners following a break-up.

The research, from Friends Reunited, also found that women are more sentimental than men, with 61% claiming they keep the photos as they highlight a part of their life they don't want to forget, versus 56% of men.

However, men may be hiding more from their partners than their other halves realise. One in five men (20%) in a current relationship who have photos of their ex-partners say they have hidden photos of an ex fearing disapproval from their new partner, compared to only 9% of women.

Corinne Sweet, behavioral psychologist said:

"The point at which people are able to put an ex-partner's photo away (after a split, divorce or death) is usually the time they are emotionally ready to move on. Yet, it is totally understandable for people to keep photos to remind them of previous loves, as, indeed, these images do form part of our life stories - whether for better or for worse."

The Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme is being piloted by police in Gwent and Wiltshire.

The scheme gives women the right to ask the police whether a new or existing partner has a violent past. If police checks show that a person may be at risk of domestic violence from their partner, the police will consider disclosing the information.

Under the scheme women will have the right to ask the police whether a new or existing partner has a violent past. If police checks show that a person may be at risk of domestic violence from their partner, the police will consider disclosing the information.

The pilot will also look at how the police can proactively release information to protect a person from domestic violence where it is lawful, necessary and proportionate to do so.

Calls for the introduction of a national disclosure scheme gained momentum following the tragic case of Clare Wood, who was murdered by her former partner in Greater Manchester in 2009.  Her partner had three previous convictions under the Protection from Harassment Act 1997.

The pilot scheme follows a successful public consultation which received more than 250 responses from a wide range of high profile statutory and voluntary organisations.

The Association of Chief Police Officers' lead on domestic abuse, Chief Constable Carmel Napier, said: 'A key part of policing is to protect people from harm.  The Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme is intended to empower people to make informed decisions to protect themselves and their children when getting involved with a new partner.

'It will also allow the police to act in the best interests of people they believe could be at risk of violence by sharing information of a partners' violent past.'

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