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A recent study from America has found that young adults are increasingly marrying at later ages—if at all—and giving birth to more children outside of marriage.

According to the study, from the Population Reference Bureau (PRB), only 20% of all households included married couples with children in 2010, down from a high of 44% in 1960. By contrast, people living alone now represent 27% of all households.

Other findings of the report include:

  • By 2012, only 46% of young adults ages 25 to 34 were married, down from 55% in 2000. The median age at first marriage continues to rise, reaching 28.1 for men and 26.5 for women in 2011.
  • Married couples and unmarried cohabiting couples are equally likely to have children younger than age 18 in their home, about 40% for each group.
  • In 2010, 41% of all births were to unmarried parents, up from 33% in 2000. The steepest increases in nonmarital births were among women in their 20s: about 63% of births to women ages 20 to 24 occurred outside of marriage in 2010.
  • Not only are women having fewer children (the current U.S. average is 1.9 children per woman), but rates of childlessness also have increased. Between 1980 and 2010, the share of women ages 40 to 44 who were childless nearly doubled, increasing from 10% to 19%.

"If current trends continue, more men and women will postpone marriage until their 30s, thus spending a smaller portion of their adult lives married," said Mark Mather, associate vice president of Domestic Programs at PRB and report co-author. "Compared to their mothers and grandmothers, more of today's 25-year-olds appear on track to remain unmarried through age 40."

A recent survey from America has found that financial arrangements are the main cause of arguments, with couples who are married or living together averaging three arguments a month over money.

According to the survey, which was conducted for the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) by Harris Interactive, 27% of those who are married or cohabiting said disagreements over money are most likely to prompt a spat. That made it the most volatile topic, ahead of arguments about children, chores, work or friends.

Since 2007, the AICPA has conducted an annual survey of Americans to determine their top financial concerns and assess their financial well-being. Additional findings include:

  • Three in ten adults who are married or living with a partner have engaged in at least one potentially deceitful behaviour related to their finances. The most common such behaviours include hiding purchases and making major purchases without consulting their significant other.
  • Among married adults, 36% of those aged 55 to 64 say financial matters cause arguments, which is notably higher than the percentage of 18- to 34-year-olds (15%), or seniors (20%), who say the same.
  • The average number of arguments prompted by financial matters rises with age. While among all married adults the average number of disagreement is three per month, among those aged 45 to 54, the average number of arguments rises to four per month.
  • More than half of those whose financial status has declined in the past year, 53%, report that financial matters are most likely to prompt arguments with their spouse.

 

Posted by on in Cohabitation

Recent research has found that 27% of married or cohabiting couples in Britain argue more about money than anything else.

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